CA Parents ‘Offended’ By Student’s ‘Racist’ Science Fair Project, Demand It Be Removed

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When parents in Sacramento, California, saw the “racist” science fair project one student from C.K. McClatchy High School submitted, they were immediately “offended.” Now, they have demanded the project be removed because its findings rubbed them the wrong way. Take a look and decide for yourself.

C.K. McClatchy High School in Sacramento, CA (left); A science fair project examining “Race and IQ” (right) (Photo Credit: Google View, The Sacramento Bee)

A student in the elite magnet program at C.K. McClatchy High School in California has come under fire for questioning whether certain races are more likely to lack the intelligence to handle the program’s academically challenging coursework.

The student, who has not been named by the media, is part of the Humanities and International Studies Program, or HISP, which is for students who are intellectually gifted, or who have shown an aptitude for grasping complicated topics and are more academically advanced than most of their peers.

HISP has a disproportionate number of minority students involved, something which no doubt has irked leftist proponents of institutions like Affirmative Action. The program currently has 508 students enrolled, including 12 African-Americans, 80 Hispanics, and 104 Asians, according to data provided by the district.

The HISP student in question came up with a controversial theory; namely, that there was just cause for the disproportionate racial breakdown within the gifted program because some races, as a whole, exhibit higher intelligence.

The student set out to prove his theory via the school’s science fair. His project has since created mass hysteria, because it suggested that, typically, minorities exhibit lower intelligence than their white counterparts.

According to The Sacramento Bee, the project that started the controversy was titled “Race and IQ.” It raised the hypothesis: “If the average IQs of blacks, Southeast Asians, and Hispanics are lower than the average IQs of non-Hispanic whites and Northeast Asians, then the racial disproportionality in (HISP) is justified.”

A student from C.K. McClatchy High School in Sacramento, CA, performed a science experiment examining “Race and IQ.” (Photo Credit: The Sacramento Bee)

The McClatchy student tested his race and intelligence hypothesis by having a handful of unidentified teens of various races take an online intelligence test.

His report concluded that “the lower average IQs of blacks, Southeast Asians, and nonwhite Hispanics means that they are not as likely as non-Hispanic whites and Northeast Asians to be accepted into a more academically rigorous program such as HISP. Therefore, the racial disproportionality of HISP is justified.”

The project was put on display with others last Monday afternoon to be judged by a team of community members as part of the fourth annual Mini Science Fair. It was removed by Wednesday morning after students, parents, and staff complained. The science fair was open to students and parents, according to Fox News.

Here’s the catch — the student who entered the “racist” science fair project isn’t white, he’s Asian.

A student from C.K. McClatchy High School in Sacramento, CA, performed a science experiment examing “Race and IQ.” His report concluded that “the lower average IQs of blacks, Southeast Asians, and nonwhite Hispanics means that they are not as likely as non-Hispanic whites and Northeast Asians to be accepted into a more academically rigorous program such as HISP. Therefore, the racial disproportionality of HISP is justified.” (Photo Credit: The Sacramento Bee)

Was this project controversial? Yes. Should the school be throwing out the student’s findings simply because they ruffled a few feathers? No. That’s precisely the problem with our increasingly politically correct culture.

The student did not set out to prove that all people of color are stupid. He simply hypothesized that the racial breakdown in HISP is justified, and he’s right. It makes no sense for there to be an equal number of black, Hispanic, Asian, and white students in the program. Admittance should not be based upon race, but merit. After all, allowing someone to participate based solely on the color of their skin is the very definition of racism.

If one race statistically shows higher intelligence than another, regardless of the reason, it should be expected that there will be more students of that race in academically elite programs.

That is not to say that ALL blacks and Hispanics are less intelligent than whites. Perhaps, instead of getting our panties in a bunch over the results of the McClatchy student’s science experiment, we ought to be asking WHY black and Hispanic students, as a whole, show lower intelligence than their white peers.

Is it because, statistically, black children are far more likely to grow up in a broken home, creating a chaotic atmosphere that is adverse to learning? Is it because black and Mexican families typically place less importance on education than Asian families? Could it be correlated to household income or education level of the parents?

These are all fascinating and relevant questions which could be asked in response to the McClatchy student’s science fair project, and answering them would be a far better intellectual exercise than simply throwing out the boy’s findings altogether, simply because they are considered controversial.

By removing the student’s project, the school is teaching that we shouldn’t ask sensitive questions. Perhaps even more concerning, they are teaching that inconvenient or uncomfortable facts should be swept under the rug instead of being addressed head-on.

That’s not going to get us anywhere. It won’t increase understanding, it won’t create critical thinkers, and it certainly won’t help the generation address important, albeit controversial, issues affecting the general population.

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